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Tantum ergo part 3

V. Panem de caelo praestitisti eis. (T.P. Alleluia)
R. Omne delectamentum in se habentem. (T.P. Alleluia)
Oremus: Deus, qui nobis sub sacramento mirabili, passionis tuae memoriam reliquisti: tribue, quaesumus, ita nos corporis et sanguinis tui sacra mysteria venerari, ut redemptionis tuae fructum in nobis iugiter sentiamus. Qui vivis et regnas in saecula saeculorum.
R. Amen.

This is one where the word order is very different between Latin and English, so I'll go back to Fr Caswall's way of rearranging the Latin to suit the English for the word for word version:

Praestitisti
Thou gavest
eis
them
panem
bread
de
from
coelo.
heaven.

Habentem
Having
in
in
se
itself
omne
all
delectamentum.
delight.

Oremus
Let us pray

Deus,
O God,
qui
who
reliquisti
has left
nobis
to us
sub mirabili Sacramento
under the wondrous Sacrament
memoriam
a memorial
tuae passionis;
of thy passion

tribue,
grant
quaesumus,
we beseech thee
nos
that we
ita venerari
may so venerate
sacra mysteria
the sacred mysteries
tui corporis
of thy body
et sanguinis,
and blood

ut
that
sentiamus
we may experience
jugiter
continually
in nobis
within us
fructum
the fruit
tuae redemptionis;
of thy redemption

qui
who
vivis
lives
et regnas
and reigns
in saecula
unto ages
saeculorum.
of ages.

Caelum - heaven - can be spelled with "ae" or "oe". The two sound the same in most Church Latin guides. In restored classical pronunciation caelum sounds like Kyloom and coelum sounds like Koiloom. Even though it ends with an "um" it is declined like the masculine 2nd declension.

When we went through this at the whiteboard we got side-tracked into declining "nos"

Nominative nos
Genitive nostrum/nostri
Dative nobis
Accusative nos
Ablative nobis

The table didn't include the vocative case because you don't usually talk to yourself like that.

Evan der Milner has a great way of going through the cases with the parts of the hand and arm - see this for example with the 2nd declension masculine.

Right now the Cambridge Latin course materials are available for free. I'm wondering with all these different ways to learn Latin, maybe as long as you keep going, whatever way you choose will bring you closer to the goal - all roads lead to Rome. Or it doesn't matter how slow you go, as long as you don't stop.

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